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All about the herpetological world.

I´ve got eggs coocking!

Posted by Miqe on June 24, 2009

It has been well over 15 years since I tried to hatch snake-egg the last time, but I am going to give it a go this year again. Got eggs from one of the most beautiful Cloubrids in Europe, the Leopardsnake Zamenis situla. This species is known to have rather small numbers of eggs in their clutches, usually about 2-5 eggs/clutch. This female is really large, about 120 centimeters compared to the normal size around 100 centimeters, and the clutchsize for her 2 years in a row is 10 eggs! The incubationtime is somewhere between 60 – 80 days, depending on the temperature.

Some pictures:

Egg-sizes ranging from the largest: 45 x 25 mm´s to the smallest: 37 x 27 mm´s.

Egg-sizes ranging from the largest: 45 x 25 mm´s to the smallest: 37 x 27 mm´s.

 

Z. situla eggs.

Z. situla eggs.

The proud mom..

The proud mom..

I also got some eggs from Aegean four-lined snake, Elaphe quatuorlineata muenteri, witch is the smaller islandform. The inland form reaches about 180 centimeters, but this subspecies becomes only about 120 – 130 centimeters in length.
I didn´t expect any eggs from the pair I keep, as I thought that they needed another year of growing first. As they are quite shy, I don´t see them more then about 10 seconds a week, I was surprised to see that the female was really fat. I put in a box with Sphagnum-moss in their terrarium, and it took only about an hour for her to enter the box and start digging around.
Since it was quite late, I decided to leave her for the night, and lookid in the box when I got home from work the following afternoon. And what do you know.. 4 eggs in the moss.
Some pictures:
Eggsize ranging from the largest at 77 x 22 mm´s to the smallest at 60 x 25 mm´s.

Eggsize ranging from the largest at 77 x 22 mm´s to the smallest at 60 x 25 mm´s.

Elaphe quatuorlineata muenteri eggs.

Elaphe quatuorlineata muenteri eggs.

The female, photographed late 2008.

The female, photographed late 2008.

The incubator.

The incubator.

Incubator.

Incubator.

 

More info and updates on Terrarium Morbidum forum (nonvenomous snakes section).

5 Responses to “I´ve got eggs coocking!”

  1. […] Leopard snakes: here. And here. […]

  2. Miqe said

    The first one of the Elaphe quatuorlineata muenteri is allmost out!!!

    67 days in the egg, and I could see it´s head stick out from the eggshell at 05:30 local Swedish time!!
    I am really excited to get home from work today, to see if the others have pipped too and to take some photos of the small wonders. I am, as far as I know, the first one in Sweden to hatch these. Kind of cool..

  3. Wow this is really interesting stuff that you are sharing here..
    Looking at the date of your last comment it would be interesting to hear how you got on and how many hatched?
    Did you keep any of them?
    Must have been a great experience seeing them come out of their egg shells..

    Look forward to hearing back from you.
    Thanks..

  4. Miqe said

    Hey “Supplies”!

    Thanks!

    Well.. Here´s the rest of the story..

    Out of the 4 E. q. muenteri-eggs, 1 turned bad, and was thrown away ( nothing inside )1 hatched out as it should and 2 died fully developed inside the eggs.

    Of the 10 Z. situla-eggs, 6 hatched out fine and the other 4 was dead inside. The dead ones was fully developed.

    I am of the wiev, that if a snake don´t have the strength to get out of the egg by itself, it is likley to cause problems later on. So, therefor I do not cut eggs. I might however assist a snake if it is allmost out, and just needs a “little push”.

    I will keep the E. q. muenteri, and maybe one of the Z. situlas.. But the rest is up for sale.

    More info here: http://www.terrariummorbidum.se/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=905

    And here: http://www.terrariummorbidum.se/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=914

    //Miqe

  5. […] Leopard snakes: here. And here. […]

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