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RATTLERS, PEEPERS, & SNAPPERS; Discovering New England’s Amphibians and Reptiles

Posted by Miqe on March 27, 2008

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Rattlers, Peepers and Snappers; Discovering New England’s Amphibians & Reptiles, is a new DVD scheduled for release in June of 2008. This interactive DVD is designed for anyone who wants to learn about herpetology, natural history, or any of the 53 fascinating amphibians and reptiles in our own backyard of New England.

Vince Franke, of Peregrine Productions, has collaborated with Herpetologist Jim Andrews, of Middlebury College, to produce an impressive DVD that includes: two separate ½ hour educational programs (Amphibians of New England and Reptiles of New England), 53 individual species accounts, field adventures with experts, and quizzes to test your listening and ID skills.

For the past 3 years Vince has traveled all over New England to get close-up action footage of every amphibian and reptile species found in the region. He has met with over 30 herpetologists, ecologists, and naturalists, to develop this DVD and be able to share the lessons and information of these fascinating creatures. “I want to excite people about the wildlife we have in our own backyards” says Vince Franke.

The DVD will be available for purchase from http://www.peregrineproductions.com. Please email vince@peregrineproductions.com to be notified via email when the DVD is available.

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The two educational programs incorporate a series of field trips with local experts from across New England as well as highlighting current research projects with University graduate students from the University of Maine, the University of Massachusetts, Berkshire Community College, and the University of Connecticut. Topics include the identification, natural history, and conservation of all the snakes, turtles, lizards, frogs, and salamanders of New England.

Using the latest video equipment and lenses, Vince gets some impressive close-up action footage of all of our local species. I think you will agree that seeing these beautiful creatures moving through their natural environment is much more effective as a learning tool than still photos or plates.

The DVD is geared for a wide variety of uses and viewers. The easily navigated menus allow a viewer to watch a program in its entirety, to play individual six-minute field trips, or to bounce around the species accounts to see and learn about individual species, their field marks, habitat uses, and ecology. The material and organization is flexible and comprehensive enough to fit into the lesson plans of educators at all levels. It also could be loaded onto a small hand-held computer and used as a field guide. The fascinating variety of species captured in the video is sure to inspire viewers and broaden their understanding of our reptile and amphibian neighbors.

AMPHIBIAN ADVENTURES

REPTILE ADVENTURES

  • -Spring Migration
  • -Stream Salamanders
  • -Amphibian Road Crossings
  • -Night Time Road Search
  • -Vernal Pools
  • -Wood Frog Research
  • -Looking For Copperheads
  • -Finding Worm Snakes
  • -Skinks and Snakes
  • -North American Racer Project
  • -Fall Migration
  • -Finding Timber Rattlesnakes
  • -Box Turtle Research
  • -Turtle Tunnels
  • -Nesting Turtles
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3 Responses to “RATTLERS, PEEPERS, & SNAPPERS; Discovering New England’s Amphibians and Reptiles”

  1. […] The apparently sudden appearance of angiosperms in the fossil record confounded Darwin, who worried that it might pose a problem for his theory of evolution by natural selection. RATTLERS, PEEPERS, & SNAPPERS; Discovering New England’s Amphibians and Reptiles: here. […]

  2. joia said

    Dear Sir,

    what’s the chance you have to get me Pipa carvalhoi?

    Yours,

    Nelson Jóia

  3. […] RATTLERS, PEEPERS, & SNAPPERS; Discovering New England's … rattler jpg spiny jpg. The two educational programs incorporate a series of field trips with local experts from across New England as well as highlighting current research projects with University graduate students from the University . […]

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